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The How & When of Feeding Horses

Reprinted by permission from the University of Kentucky - College of Agriculture ASC-143
Laurie Lawrence, Department of Animal Sciences

HOW and WHEN a horse is fed may be just as important as what a horse is fed.

Providing horses with good nutrition is essential for normal growth, reproduction and performance. Horses should receive feeds that are adequate but not excessive in required nutrients. However, just providing the right feeds is often not enough to ensure that horses are receiving optimal nutrition. HOW and WHEN a horse is fed may be just as important as what a horse is fed. The HOW of horse feeding includes the type of feeding system used (group or individual). The WHEN of horse feeding includes the number and timing of meals that a horse receives. Good feeding management should encourage adequate consumption of feed and limit wastage. In addition, good feeding management should promote the safety and well being of horses.

Number & Timing of Meals

...grazing periods are rarely separated by more than two or three hours of non-eating behaviors.

In the natural state, horses are grazing animals that may spend up to 60% of their time eating. Grazing and resting periods are interspersed so that grazing periods are rarely separated by more than two or three hours of non-eating behaviors. When domestic horses are kept in a true pasture situation, most will adopt the grazing pattern described for horses in the natural state. However, many horses have limited access to pasture and will receive their nutrient needs from hay and concentrates in a more regimented environment.

...stalled horses may consume a typical hay and concentrate ration in two to four hours

In pasture situations, horses may spend 12-14 hours a day grazing. By comparison, stalled horses may consume a typical hay and concentrate ration in two to four hours. When the diets fed to stalled horses are high in roughage, more time will be spent eating than when the diet is high in concentrates. Because horses in stalls often spend less time eating than horses in pastures, they may be more inclined to occupy their time with undesirable activities such as stall vices, or wood chewing. Wood chewing appears to occur more at night in stabled horses and is increased when low roughage rations are fed.

...their digestive tract is designed to accommodate small meals, in that the stomach is relatively small.

Horses have evolved to consume small amounts of feed several times a day, rather than large amounts of feed once or twice a day. Anatomically, their digestive tract is designed to accommodate small meals, in that the stomach is relatively small. Despite the fact that the horse is more physiologically adapted to many small meals each day, it is not uncommon for feed to be provided only two (or occasionally three) times a day for many horses that are housed in stalls. This feeding practice may be labor efficient, but it may not be the most desirable situation for the horse, particularly if large amounts of concentrate are being fed. The following situations may result when horses are fed two times per day:

  1. When a large amount of concentrate is fed before the roughage component of the diet, the horse may consume the grain readily and then have a reduced appetite for the hay. The horse may "pick at the hay or waste the hay by mixing it in the bedding. In either case, the horse will not be consuming the nutrients that are contained in the hay.

  2. A high and rapid concentrate intake may increase the possibility of digestive disturbances. "Concentrates are feeds such as cereal grains (oats, corn, barley, etc.) and commercially mixed feeds that are concentrated forms of energy. Concentrates are high in starch. It has been estimated that the maximum amount of starch that should be fed in one meal to a mature horse is 3.5 to 4 lb (1000 lb horse). When higher levels are fed, starch may bypass the small intestine and enter the large intestine where it will be fermented by the microbes in the cecum and large intestine. Excessive concentrate intake has been suggested as a causative factor in the occurrence of colic in horses. A large concentrate meal has also been associated with large shifts in plasma volume and changes in other cardiovascular parameters.



 

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  • As we browse the internet we repeatedly find articles that support our belief that horses need to be fed smaller meals, more often, to promote good health. The links provided for you below are for your convenience only. We are not suggesting that the authors or owners of these websites in any way, approve of, or endorse Stable Grazer automatic hay feeders.

    It is our goal to provide you with as much information as possible so that you can come to your own conclusion. We believe that as you read through the linked articles below you will begin to see what seems to be a common factor with many of the health issues we have with our horses today. And that is the way in which we feed our horses.

    We will be adding more links as time goes on, so if you're not yet convinced, check back often to see if any new links have been added.